Op-Ed: What is the Price of Democracy?

After serving three years on the Newmarket Town Council, I realize that many local issues require state-level solutions. For instance, Republicans in the legislature cut taxes for businesses and the wealthy, leading to property tax increases for the working class, with town council and budget committees taking the blame. Ideally, I would address these systemic issues by running for a position in the House of Representatives or Senate in New Hampshire. However, the state's policy of paying Representatives and Senators just $100 per year means that working-class individuals like me can't afford to serve in Concord. This has resulted in a legislature where 80% of members are wealthy. They are the only ones who can afford to take time out of their week to participate in the New Hampshire State House. This disparity creates a democratic deficit, as the legislature fails to represent the broader population of New Hampshire. That is why I'm running for governor. It's the only way I can afford to serve my state and address these community issues. I propose a $20,000 annual salary for state legislators, totaling $8 million—less than what the Republicans allocated for the education freedom voucher fund this year. What, then, is the price of democracy? It's at least $20,000 per year. Democracy is priceless to New Hampshire, and I'm committed to advocating for changes that will bring true representation to the legislative branch. New Hampshire must embrace true democracy. You can learn about my campaign on my website: www.VoteKiper.org

By Jon Kiper

January 17, 2024

After serving three years on the Newmarket Town Council, I realize that many local issues require state-level solutions. For instance, Republicans in the legislature cut taxes for businesses and the wealthy, leading to property tax increases for the working class, with town council and budget committees taking the blame.

Ideally, I would address these systemic issues by running for a position in the House of Representatives or Senate in New Hampshire. However, the state’s policy of paying Representatives and Senators just $100 per year means that working-class individuals like me can’t afford to serve in Concord.

This has resulted in a legislature where 80% of members are wealthy. They are the only ones who can afford to take time out of their week to participate in the New Hampshire State House. This disparity creates a democratic deficit, as the legislature fails to represent the broader population of New Hampshire.

That is why I’m running for governor. It’s the only way I can afford to serve my state and address these community issues. I propose a $20,000 annual salary for state legislators, totaling $8 million—less than what the Republicans allocated for the education freedom voucher fund this year.

What, then, is the price of democracy? It’s at least $20,000 per year. Democracy is priceless to New Hampshire, and I’m committed to advocating for changes that will bring true representation to the legislative branch. New Hampshire must embrace true democracy. You can learn about my campaign on my website: www.VoteKiper.org

Author

CATEGORIES: Uncategorized

Politics

VIDEO: What’s Your IVF Story?

VIDEO: What’s Your IVF Story?

In Vitro Fertilization has become a political talking point—but there’s more to the story. We want to give everyday Granite Staters who have IVF on...

Local News

Related Stories
Share This