Granite Staters! Last day to change party affiliation before the state primary is June 4

Election voting. (Via Getty Images)

Via Getty Images

By Mrinali Dhembla

May 23, 2024

Attention Granite Staters!

Registered voters who wish to change their party affiliation before the State primary election on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2024 need to do so in person by Tuesday, June 4.

Who might want to do this?

If you’re registered with a political party and you want to vote in the primary election, you will only receive a ballot to elect candidates from that political party.

That means if you’re registered as a Republican in New Hampshire, but you want to vote for a non-Republican candidate, you must change your party affiliation to do so. Same goes for if you’re a registered Democrat—you’ll receive a Democratic primary ballot unless you change your political party before June 4.

Why can I only vote for one party?

The purpose of a primary election is to narrow down the field of candidates for each office to just one candidate per political party. Then, those candidates will face off in the general election on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Members of each political party are the people charged with weighing in (by voting) on who they feel would be best to represent their values in the general election.

What if I don’t want to change my political party, but I want to vote for a different party in the primary election?

You can change your political party to “undeclared” by the June 4 deadline. This will allow you to vote for any political party.

If you want to keep your “undeclared” status moving forward, you should tell the supervisor of the precinct where you’re voting before you leave (or your clerk’s office, if voting by mail). Otherwise, you’ll be automatically registered for whichever party you vote for in the primary election.

I don’t remember if I am party-affiliated or undeclared.

No problem! You can check all your voter information, including your party affiliation and even if you’re registered to vote at all, here.

How do I change my party affiliation?

Go to your town or city clerk in-person before the June 4 deadline. Find your clerk’s office by selecting your town or city name in the dropdown menu here.

Does party affiliation matter in the general election on Nov. 5?

It doesn’t! The purpose of a primary is to narrow down candidates from each party before the general election, so everyone receives the same ballot on the day of the general election. Here’s an example of what people saw on their ballots on Nov.5, 2020.

What’s the primary election?

The state’s primary election will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 10. All registered voters are encouraged to participate.

The purpose of a primary election is to narrow down the field of candidates for each office to just one candidate per political party. Then, those candidates will face off in the general election on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Members of each political party are the people charged with weighing in (by voting) on who they feel would be best to represent their values in the general election.

Who will be on the ballot in the primary election?

The presidential primary already happened, on Jan. 23. You can read about the results of that election here.

In the Sept. 10 primary, you’ll be able to vote for candidates running for governor, state senators, state representatives, and any local races that have multiple candidates from the same party running for a single seat.

I’m not registered to vote, but I want to vote in the primary election. What should I do?

You can either register to vote at your nearest town hall any time before the election, or register on-the-spot on the primary election day, which is Tuesday, Sept. 10, at your polling location. Find your polling place here.

I have more questions about voting in New Hampshire.

The New Hampshire Secretary of State’s website is the one-stop destination for all things voting-related.

Author

  • Mrinali Dhembla

    Based in Manchester, Mrinali Dhembla is Granite Post's multimedia reporter. She's previously worked as deputy editor at The Keene Sentinel, and has experience writing for many national and international publications. When not doing journalism, she likes to cook food (and eat it).

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